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Park Sherman

Early lighters used the name Park Sherman; later the name was typically abbreviated to simply Park - though areas of the lighter where the patent number was shown still typically had Park Sherman. The name "Park Sherman" came from the name of owner Jacob Sherman's first son.

Jacon Sherman organized the Universal Lamp Co. at 1018 S. Wabash St, Chicago, IL between 1914 and 1922. Somewhere between then and 1932 it became Park Sherman. Jacob Sherman purchased the Shanklin Manufacturing Company of Springfield, IL in 1932 to provide manufacturing capabilities for his own company. Through a series of reorganizations, the Park Sherman Company (named for Jacob Sherman's first son) operated in Springfield, Illinois until 1960 when it was sold to a New Jersey company.

The "Storm King Torch", a miner's cap light, was manufactured under the Shanklin name - the original manufacturer of it. The Storm King name, of course, turns up later in various cigarette lighters produced by Park Sherman. The company sold miner's supplies (miners' cap lamps, match cases, etc.) and later specialized in things like coin banks and smoking accessories (lighters, cigarette cases, etc). Some time later Storm King Torches were produced by the Universal Lamp Company, a subsidiary of Park Sherman.

The company's products were sold throughout the 1930s to the 1960s. 'Everdry' was a brand name that Park Sherman used on some of its products. The word "Everdry" was used, for example, on match cases to indicate that the case would prevent the matches from getting wet.

In 1960 the Park Sherman name was sold to the New Jersey firm of Ketcham & McDougall and the Park Sherman Division moved from Springfield to Murfreesboro, Tennessee due to high wage costs and labor problems.

PRIMARY SOURCE: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=372576 & Art Deco Chrome by Jim Linz