Wilderness and Wildlife Management Areas

in Sabine National Forest

NOTE: See Wildlife Management Area Regulations

The Sabine National Forest, largely in Sabine County, Tx. and extending into Jasper, Newton, Shelby and San Augustine Counties boasts some of the best outdoor recreational areas around. Sabine National Forest has 160,656 acres for the enjoyment of area residents as well as visitors from all over the country. Primitive camping is permitted on the National Forest land unless posted otherwise.

There are recreational areas and wilderness areas located in the Sabine National Forest. These areas are easily accessible and they are for the public to enjoy.

Boles Field Recreation AreaMoore Plantation Wildlife Management Area:

The 27,034 acre Moore Plantation Wildlife Management Area offers hunting (proper Texas permits, stamps, license required) and camping. Campers may camp in the Moore Plantation area except during the hunting seasons. During the hunting seasons all camping in the Moore Plantation is restricted to two camps. Maps of these campsites are posted in the Management Area. Portable deer stands may be used but may not be left unattended for more than 72 hours. Motor vehicles are restricted to designated roads and all terrain vehicles are not allowed except when used by qualified disabled persons. NOTE: See Wildlife Management Area Regulations

Moore Plantation Wildlife Management Area begins about 2 miles East of Pineland Texas along Highway 2426 and extends to Highway 87 South of Hemphill, Texas. Click on Moore WMA Map for enlargement

Indian Mounds Wilderness Area

The Indian Mounds Wilderness Area, located east of Hemphill, TX, is in the Yellowpine District; the 12,369 acre area is south of Hwy. 83 and northeast of FM 944. The boundaries are identified by silver and black signs. Visitors are welcome to enjoy the area: hike, hunt, camp, etc., however, the Wilderness Act prohibits the use of any mechanized equipment (i.e., vehicles, chainsaws, 3 or 4 wheelers). Several roads are open which allow access through the area: FM 3382, FS Road 115 and County Road SAB 28.

DIRECTIONS: From Hemphill follow Highway 83 east for 3.5 miles to designated wilderness parking area.

Indian Mounds is comprised of 12,369 acres. Indian Mounds is the home of 4 championship trees; a National Co-Champion Little-hip Hawthorn and 3 State Champions: a Flatwoods Plum, Florida Sugar Maple, and an Eastern Hop-Hornbeam. The area also contains the largest White Oak and Black Cherry in the National Forests in Texas. Here survives the largest expanse of American Beech / Southern Magnolia remaining in the world.

Turkey Hill Wilderness Area

Boles Field Recreation AreaTurkey Hill Wilderness Area contains the vanishing Shagbark Hickory / Nutmeg Hickory bottomland association known to only a few scattered floodplains in the south. Turkey Hill contains one of only two expanses of Longleaf Pine / grassland communities in the south. Besides finding almost every species known to the bottomlands of East Texas, Turkey Creek abounds in exotic plant life such as the Wild Iris, Spider Lilly, and Carolina Lilly in addition to Indian Pinks, Pawpaw, Green Dragons, and the rare Tri-Lillium.  Location: Take Texas 103 to its intersection with FR 705. Turn right and go 2.5 miles to the Bannister Wildlife Management Area sign on the west side of FM 705. Just north of the sign, you can walk an abandoned Jeep trail about a mile northwest to Clear Creek. Excellent primitive camping and hiking opportunities.

DIRECTIONS: From Broaddus follow Highway 147 north for 6 miles to Wilderness.

NOTE: Turkey Hill is in Angelina National Forest, not Sabine National Forest. It is included here because it is in close proximity to the Toledo Bend Reservoir and Sabine County, Texas.